canada, indian, hare, moccasons, tippy toes, medieval walk, moesgaard, tuxen, collections

On tippy-toes: Hare Indian moccasins

Leave a comment
North America

I learnt recently that we used to walk differently. Before the Middle Ages, and the invention of shoes as we know them today with thick soles to protect our feet, our toes hit the ground before our heels. Try it out – it is rather like tiptoeing, and can be quite hard in our big, lumpy, thick-soled shoes. But apparently this way of walking leads to a better posture, and to nicely shaped and muscular calves. And who wouldn’t want that?!

In my longing to walk like the olden days (and to have nicely shapes calves), I scoured our database for shoes that would allow me to do so, without feeling like an idiot in my sneakers or leather boots. I know, I know, I cannot actually wear these beautiful moccasins, but a girl can dream, right? They were collected by zoologist and shoe collector Søren Ludvig Tuxen (read more about him here), and he describes them thus:

Canadian Indian moccasins, Hare Indians. Given to me on the 22nd of December by Mr. Hansen, Elora, Ontario, Canada, along with the following information: “Moccasins made by the Hare Indians of caribou skin tops, moose hide bottoms with edging of dyed porcupine quills. The Hare Indians live along the McKenzie River at fort Good Hope, 20 miles under the Arctic Circle in the North West territories of Canada. These moccasins were made for and worn by North West mounted police constable Roy Osburn, now living in Fergus, Ontario, after retiring from the force.”

So, if you see me gliding along on my tippy-toes (perhaps in a stolen pair of moccasins – schhh – don’t tell!!), like Galadriel on her way to her mirror, just know that I am just walking like we humans were supposed to. And that my calves will eventually be awesome.

If you want to know more, here is an awesome German explaining all about how to “walk Medieval”:

//Sophie Seebach

Advertisements
Posted by

putting thought to things

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s